Nuisance: Wed 7/27: NJ delegate 20 feet away from Bernie Sanders during roll-call, describes what happened to trigger the #DNCWalkout.

Richard MacFarlane, NJ Bernie Sanders delegate from North Jersey. A Berniecrat for congress that ran unsuccessfully in the primary.

1:00: “Vermont is seated right next to NJ”

1:25: “When it reached Vermont, they said ‘pass’.”

They went through the states in alphabetical order. “When it reached Vermont, they said ‘pass’.” They wanted to be the final state, but at first Richard thought it was a protest of some sort.

1:35: Gives example of what each state said when it was their turn in the roll call.

  • Brag about the state
  • Votes for Bernie
  • Votes for Hillary
  • Kept it relatively short.

2:20: Near when it made it back to Vermont again, Bernie came out. Richard could not see him, despite only twenty feet away, because of press and people.

3:45: “All the cameras were on him. The crowd was cheering Bernie.”

4:20: Didn’t hear the exact words, but after saying them, he walked straight back, up the stairs, towards the main hallway. Now he was gone.

5:15: “Everybody started walking out. And it was everybody all at once.”

“I had no prior knowledge… It didn’t really have a leadership. But they were talking about it, and they managed to do it quietly.”

6:50: “once everybody was already outside, I said, ‘Well, let’s see what they’re doing.’ It was the most interesting thing going on right then.’ ”

7:00: Jeff: “How many people got up in New Jersey?” Richard: “It seemed like all of them.”

Richard: “It seemed like all of them. [All] 48 Bernie delegates. When I left, there were a lot of people still down on the floor, walking to the stairs, using the stairs to leave.”

7:40: Richard: “It wasn’t like a few hundred people, it was a mass exit. My guess is about 1,400 people.”

“It’s took a long time to get out of the building.” Implying a large enough crowd to fill and clog the hallways.

11:00: Speculation about what happened inside the press tent: “The cops were with [those delegates in the press tent], but because there was no specific leader, it was hard to negotiate with them.”

Negotiating to get out of the building. But there were lots of interviews with the press inside the tent, but “they’ll never use it.”

15:50: Richard: “Bizarre and interesting fits this entire experience.”

18:30: “What’s new is guys like Jeff, with a mobile phone who can interview people endlessly. What’s new is social media.”

21:00: Richard: “…and then I’m probably going to have lunch.”

Jeff: “Are all Bernie delegates going to have lunch?”

Richard: “Yes. I think all Bernie delegates are going to eat lunch. That’s a good question.” Smiles.

22:25: Jeff: “I expect to see a whole lot of nothing, but that’s not the point. The point is to talk ask the people around me what they think is going on. Because that’s what matters.”

Viewer question from Jenny Smith: “What do you expect to see you today?”

Jeff: “Oh, I am here until the end. This is not fun, this is a job. You guys need to know what happens from our point of view. And we want you to know, because you were the ones that actually care about our point of view.”

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Nuisance: Wed 7/27: Interviews with three delegates on Bernie or Bust, how they discovered Bernie Sanders, and how they plan on continuing the revolution. [Timestamped highlights]

Pat Merton Coyle and Anna Payne, Bernie delegates from Bucks County, PA.

10:25: Anna’s views on Bernie or Bust.

Anna: “To me, voting for Trump, or maybe even voting third party to a point of view, is like a slap in the face to Bernie, if Trump ends up winning this election.”

Jeff: “So what is your point of view on Bernie or Bust?”

Anna: “I understand it completely. And I’m not totally against it. But at the end of the day, you really have to look at what…what’s important to you? Now, some people will not be able to sleep at night voting for Secretary Clinton. Because they do not believe in her. And they do not believe that she will hold the platform up. That she will make good decisions. And if you cannot sleep at night voting for Secretary Clinton, I completely understand why you are Bernie or Bust.”

Jeff: “So what about those that say that Bernie or Bust is effectively a vote for Trump?”

Anna: “…I hope that the Bernie or Bust people, at least come out and vote down ticket. Because that is what matters… If they vote their conscience, I can’t argue with it. I can’t. Would I like to sit down and talk with someone that’s Bernie or Bust and talk with them? Of course. And explain to them, ‘The issues that you care about’–The Supreme Court is a huge issue. And I don’t even know if many people know about the Supreme Court. The person who gets into office is going to get two to four Supreme Court nominations. Those people are going to be on the Supreme court for years. And I don’t mean three years or four years. Decades.”

13:30: Pat’s views on Bernie or Bust: “We’re mourning the loss of our campaign.”

Pat: “I want people to vote their conscience, but I want people to make informed decisions. They call them throwaway votes. I don’t believe it’s throwing away if it’s what you absolutely believe in. But for every action there’s a reaction. And if too many people are Bernie or Bust, it could hurt the whole Democratic Party, up and down the ticket…

I think right now you have to realize that we’re mourning the loss of our campaign. We’re mourning the loss of Bernie as our candidate. We have to get past that and go on. And there’s a lot of people today who are saying, ‘I’m not going to vote at all, I’m going to stay home election day and cry maybe.’ And I understand that totally, because it is such an emotional thing. But I hope as the hurt goes down and people start to heal, that they well look at the issues, and look at the important things, such as the Supreme Court, such as how we treat our fellow citizens, whether or not we’re sending our children to war. And they do vote for who they believe is the best person.”

16:00: Anna’s hair is red, white, and blue, with a small, glittery, novelty Uncle Sam hat, pointing diagonally off of her head. The hat is reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland.

Jeff: “It’s your truth. As long as it’s respectful in your own way.” There is no need for suits and ties and traditional formal dress, if it’s not your truth.

17:10: Outrageous hotel costs, and Anna and Pat live 30-60 minutes away.

Pat: “400/night. My hotel the week before last was $159/night.”

Jeff: “Of course. Because they can. Because they can.”

18:10: Wayne Lewis, Bernie delegate from NJ-5, Galloway Township.

Wayne is in his early 50s, and, beyond voting “basically Democrat”, this is his first time being involved in politics. He is a mathematician in dynamical systems, with an interest in non-linear complex systems. “I’m interested in how economies work, how ecosystems work, how deregulation works.”

Wayne discusses how he discovered Bernie Sanders, what he plans on doing to continue staying involved (“The first step is going to be to get onto county committee.”).

19:51: “If you don’t get involved and you don’t vote, you don’t really have a right to complain.”

“I had very little experience in politics. It was Bernie Sanders who actually showed me the way to go with respect to politics. [This] is the first campaign that I’ve been involved with. I voted basically Democrat, but without giving much thought to it.

There was a period where I was just, like many Americans, wrapped up in my own life. Wrapped up in what I was doing to make money, and the relationship with my family. And just not really paying much attention to what was going on outside of my own little world.

Interestingly, about three years ago, a friend of mine who is pretty conservative, he’s a Republican, said to me–and I used to say the same thing a lot of people say: ‘Why even bother? Your vote doesn’t really mean anything. It’s all rigged. And what’s the point?’.

My friend said to me, “You know, you do an awful lot of complaining about the way the things are. And if you don’t get involved and you don’t vote, you don’t really have a right to complain.”

20:25: “I started to say something smart ass”, Jeff: “because that’s what you do.” Wayne: “Because that’s what I am. That’s what I do.”

This prompted him to dive into researching many issues, discovering how serious many issues are, and how everything is interconnected. Interrelated systemically.

It was at this point he saw Bernie Sanders, who put all of these pieces together into one coherent narrative, and was swept up into the campaign. Bernie Sanders was not the catalyst for him becoming involved, the issues were the catalyst.

24:30: $15/hour, for example, implemented in a vacuum and right away is a bad thing. But implemented with healthcare reform (and other supplemental reforms) and implement it over time, that could work.

Bernie Sanders’ stump speech is a coherent narrative, not a bunch of random nice ideas.

27:25: Interconnectedness: “the reality is one thing, the political reality is another.”

Can all these things be passed through congress at once? No, but the political reality doesn’t change that these issues are interconnected. They’re two separate problems.

28:40: The economics of Bernie Sanders’ policies.

30:50: “I want to be there [tonight at the DNC] for Barack Obama’s speech to hold up a ‘No TPP’ sign.”

He’s wearing a No TPP button.

32:40: Discussion of last night’s #DNCWalkout

“On my way here I was listening to NPR, and they saying, ‘Oh, about 200 Bernie delegates walked out.’ So they were really spinning it and they’re not really reporting it accurately.”

Jeff’s estimate before discussing it with anyone else: At least 500.

Wayne’s estimate: “More than half. At least a 1000. When I was looking around, there were a LOT of empty seats.”

34:50: Jeff: “Opening gavel time was changed to 4 o’clock.”

Jeff: “I don’t want to see Obama speak. Not as a protest, it just doesn’t interest me and I’m tired.”

It is at this point that I meet Kerith Strano-Taylor.

Introducing Kerith Strano-Taylor, Democratic candidate (in the general!) for US Congress, for PA-5.

On Wednesday morning, on the third day of the Democratic National Convention, fellow New Jersey delegates and I went to a hotel in Center City Philly to attend a conference, but we were unable to get in because the room was too small for the turnout. They scheduled a new one for a few hours later, so we waited around. The point at which this video starts, I had just finished a 36 minute interview and was signing off. But then I saw this person animatedly talking with Richard, my delegate-hotel roommate, and I decided to continue recording and meet her.

Her name is Kerith Strano-Taylor and in addition to being a Bernie Sanders delegate from Pennsylvania, she is also a Democratic candidate for US Congress in PA-5, the far northwest corner of Pennsylvania. She was unchallenged in the primary, and is now in the general. Now. As you can see, she is a passionate person, and I ended up spending most of the day with her, much of it recording her talking about anything she wanted to talk about.

In this video, Kerith talks about her background, her experience as the only Democratic member of her school board (“The schools were terrible because of funding cuts. Do I take my kids to another school? No, I run for school board.”), elected by her peers as president, and why she decided to run for congress.

Please help Kerith win. Donate, volunteer, and vote for her this November.

http://kstforcongress.com

Nuisance: Wed 7/27: Waiting for a DNC conference to begin. Talking about small donors, the TPP, and Frank Underwood. [Timestamped highlights]

Highlights from this video

0:20: Impassioned speech by New Jersey delegate Richard MacFarlane about how everyone has something to give, even if it’s not a lot.

You know, we have to accept this. We all have $27 a month that we can give to a political candidate somewhere. And if we all do it then they’re going to have the money they need to run a campaign. So they don’t have to go in beg the rich people.

And if we don’t have $27, you know what, we have five dollars. Because I had five people who gave me five dollars each in my gofundme site. And I appreciate those people as much as the people who gave the most amount of money. And even more, because you know what, you got to be broke to give some guy five dollars.

So I had poor people helping me get here today. And I have to go forward with their good intentions. I have to fight for them, because they’re willing to give me their lunch money. We can’t deny that they need help, and that we can help them. What we have to do is find ways to make it matter. As long as we can figure out how to do that, and be ready to donate to candidates that matter, they won’t need the rich people. Everything can change, and it’s all going to start with you as an individual.

1:40: Michelle: “Before Bernie Sanders, You had a reason to be complacent.”

“Before Bernie Sanders, You had a reason to be complacent… You had to know people, you had to have big, dirty money. You don’t have that excuse anymore, that you can’t do it with small money.”

5:20: We realize that Bernie Sanders was 40 years old in 1981, when he first became mayor of Burlington. Many of us in our forties feel hope.

6:00: Wayne: “I’m a young 50.” Jeff: “You don’t look a day over 72.”

6:35: Jeff: “Can you please describe the big F.U.?” Frank Underwood. Netflix is giving out shirts in front of the Convention Center.

They end by discussing campaign-finance, citizens United, and how the TPP is the immediate crisis and trumps all of it.

Bernie Sanders NJ pledged delegate Richard MacFarlane: “If we don’t have $27, we have $5. I appreciate those people even more, because, you know what, you got to be broke to give some guy five dollars.”

From this full video.

You know, we have to accept this. We all have $27 a month that we can give to a political candidate somewhere. And if we all do it then they’re going to have the money they need to run a campaign. So they don’t have to go in beg the rich people.

And if we don’t have $27, you know what, we have five dollars. Because I had five people who gave me five dollars each in my gofundme site. And I appreciate those people as much as the people who gave the most amount of money. And even more, because you know what, you got to be broke to give some guy five dollars.

So I had poor people helping me get here today. And I have to go forward with their good intentions. I have to fight for them, because they’re willing to give me their lunch money. We can’t deny that they need help, and that we can help them. What we have to do is find ways to make it matter. As long as we can figure out how to do that, and be ready to donate to candidates that matter, they won’t need the rich people. Everything can change, and it’s all going to start with you as an individual.

Michelle adds her thoughts:

Before Bernie Sanders, You had a reason to be complacent… You had to know people, you had to have big, dirty money. You don’t have that excuse anymore, that you can’t do it with small money.

Nuisance: Wed 7/27: Lunch with Kerith Strano-Taylor. [Timestamped highlights]

I met Kerith about an hour ago, when we all attended a working family party conference on “continuing the revolution”, and we are now all making our way to the DNC together. First we stop for lunch. On the way, I teach Kerith how easy it is to livestream (“That’s it?!”), and ask if I can keep the camera on her so her constituents can hear her talk about…anything. And because it is a livestream, they can ask questions.

We arrive and I start the livestream, Kerith uses her phone to share it to a couple of her pages (watching me with a 15 second delay, from right across the table), and we begin. The lighting on Kerith is terrible for the first few minutes, but greatly improves after we switch sides at the six minute mark.

Highlights from this video

8:45: Jeff: “I might as well show you my lunch. That’s what social media is all about right?

9:10: Kerith wants the camera off of her so she can take a bite to eat. Michelle: “Hello my name is Michelle, and today I’ll be playing the part of Kerith.”

They talk in depth about charter schools. How their only benefit is making rich people richer. Michelle and Kerith are both on their local school boards.

15:00: Kerith reviews how her current Republican congressman believes that the lessons of charter schools should be brought to public schools…meaning that unions should be dismantled.

17:00: Charter schools get their money before public schools do, because only they have the right to sue.

18:30-25:20: Discussion of the idea of arming teachers: Kerith: “I’m a good shot, I like to shoot. But I don’t think I would be nearly as a good shot if I was being shot at. Let alone a whole bunch of babies between me and the target.”

No insurance company will grant policies to the schools that choose to do this.

24:15: Michelle: “We are resigned to so many things that we shouldn’t be resigning too. Like Bernie says, ‘Never lose your sense of outrage.'”

Jeff: “Are we allowed to have any sense of outrage at the DNC? No. Because that implies that there is a reason to have our age, and they can’t go there. They don’t want to go there.”

26:30: Kerith: “Trump believes that the country is broken and can’t get any worse. Bernie believes it’s is broken and that it can only get better. Hillary doesn’t believe that the country is broken.”

29:55: Kerith’s view on guns, as asked by a viewer.

32:55: Why Kerith likes guns.

She has no gun at home. But my neighbor “is well enough armed that, so at the zombie apocalypse, he can take care of me and my family.”

34:00: Discussion of the concept of taking a single incident of a crime, and expanding it into a law against all people, resulting in a more nefarious purpose. Such as voter ID laws preventing people to vote or with purchasing firearms.

42:15 Kerith’s friend and campaign volunteer, Jen. They met when Kerith represented her child’s father in court. According to Jen, Kerith was declared child advocate of the year.

46:30: Jen: “It’s not how well you can help people, it’s how good you can get a speech, how are you can raise money, how much you vote with your party.”

Nuisance: Wed 7/27: A Hillary delegate’s perspective of the the #DNCWalkout. [Timestamped highlights]

Councilman Kwanzaa Hall from Atlanta, and friend of Killer Mike, while traveling on the subway.

Highlights from this video

0: Bernie delegates are feeling disenfranchised by the Hillary campaign and by the Democratic Party

He states it wasn’t totally appropriate that Bernie people cheered in the middle of speakers, but,

come on, this is the Super Bowl of politics… You’ve never been heckled? … Sorry y’all, that means you haven’t done enough to reach out.

If you haven’t reached out to people and they feel like you don’t give a shit, that’s what you get! It’s on you. The onus is on the person who is trying to lead.

3:55: His perspective of the walkout: “It’s all fair in politics.”

The fact that some people walked out and they didn’t want to be a part of the process at that moment? It means you’re supposed to go out and ask them, ‘Hey, Can we have another conversation?’

The folks who are on the winner side or the ones that need to reach out.

5:05: Discussing the booing of Elijah Cummings on Monday night.

He thought it was unfortunate, but not directed to him, and the scheduling of the speakers enabled.

I, Jeff, spoke to Mr. Cummings off the record on Tuesday, and he was viscerally, visibly angry. I found it surprising that someone so involved in the African-American struggle was unable to see the motivations behind it, and was only taking it personally. I understand he gradually responded on the record with respect towards the protesters.

7:30: Kerith talks about how the term “white privilege” makes no sense in her district, which is primarily white and poor.

9:20: Michelle brings up Hillary Clinton’s struggles with authenticity.

11:30: Kerith: Some of Trunp’s supporters think he’s authentic.

One thing Trump was successful with, that Bernie was not, was that Trump won despite the establishment not wanting him.

3:15: Councilman: “He needed to pivot that because of the reality of this business.”

He is framing Bernie Sanders stump speech as “narrative” as opposed to realistic/actual policy. But with Bernie Sanders, those two things are one of the same.

Jeff: “How do you pivot when your word is your bond?”

He answers, but the true answer, in my opinion, is that you don’t. When your word is your bond you don’t pivot. You change your words the first time, so pivoting is not necessary. “Pivot” is a pretty and gentle word for lie and mislead.

15:30: Kerith makes the point that Bernie was getting so many new voters, that he should’ve focused less on persuadable voters. Kwanzaa agrees.

As we approach the station in the end of the video, I ask him his name again. He says he’s a city councilman in district 2 in Atlanta Georgia.

Jeff: “And you’re in Killer Mike’s district right?” Kwanzaa: “No, Killer Mike is in mine.” Smirks.