Nuisance: Tues 7/26: Morning instructions at NJ-delegate hotel breakfast. I cast of the most important votes of my life. [Timestamped highlights]

Highlights from this video

0-3:45: “Vote for roll call when you pick up your credentials. There is no ballot.”

New Jersey Hillary superdelegate announcing brief roll call instructions, and then lists some of the extra “fun” activities available to delegates and others.

“Vote when you pick up your credentials. There is no ballot.”

She thanks George Norcross for his generosity in making these activities possible.

3:45: Pan of the breakfast conference room, on the third floor, at the New Jersey delegation hotel. Walking down to the credentials table on the second floor.

4:45-6:35: Table of campaign buttons for sale.

7:00-39:00: Waiting in line credentials and roll call. While waiting, three interviews with Hillary and Bernie delegates.

7:00: A tchotchke bag is handed to me.

7:15-11:05: Interview with Hillary delegate: “I didn’t expect so much division at this stage of the convention.”

She is from Westfall New Jersey, is likely a Hillary delegate, and her husband is the Essex County Clerk. Unknown name.

Jeff: “So what has your experience been so far at the DNC?”

Hillary delegate: “Crazy. I guess I didn’t expect so much division at this stage of the convention. But it’s good.”

Jeff: “What is your view of that? Some Hillary supporters are resentful of the booing and are saying ‘it’s over’.”

Hillary delegate: “I’m not resentful [of the Bernie protests]. I guess everyone is entitled to their opinion. But you figure, if Bernie endorsed her and dropped out of the race, then that’s kind of where we’re at.”

Jeff: “Well, he endorsed her, but he didn’t drop out of the race. I’m voting for him as soon as we get to the table. Will he likely win? No. But from my point of view, it’s the closure. This is my letting go of him.”

Hillary delegate: “Do you think it [this division, if all of these people vote for Bernie in the general] hurts. [That] it would allow Trump in? [That] it gives Trump advantage?”

Jeff: “I’m not Bernie or Bust, but I have a lot of friends who are Bernie or Bust. They’re in a really difficult position. They’re being blamed before it’s even happened. That if they don’t vote for Hillary, then they’re the cause of Trump. I personally think that’s not totally fair, because, what has the Democratic Party done to earn their vote? Did they leave the party or did the party leave them?

I’m absolutely passionate about Bernie.”

Hillary delegate: “Clearly”

Jeff: “I’m not Bernie or Bust, but I don’t see that she has worked very hard to earn my vote.”

Hillary delegate: “Just curious. I’m more neutral, I don’t have an extreme feeling either way.”

17:35-22:05: Aida Luz, A fellow Bernie delegate in my district.

She informs me of a 10 AM meeting (within the hour) with all New Jersey Bernie delegates and superdelegate John Wisniewski. This is the first I’ve heard.

Aida is a former Hillary supporter. She believes voting for Hillary is important to defeat Trump, but acknowledges much of the questionable activities during the election, and says that she would prefer Elizabeth Warren over Hillary.

24:40-29:05: Interview with Kristin Affrime: “I couldn’t be more privileged and honored to vote for Bernie Sanders”

Fran is the person who I had a conversation on the bus yesterday morning regarding the TPP. Kristen and Aida are both Bernie delegates in my same district in New Jersey.

25:10: Kristin:

I couldn’t be more privileged and honored to vote for Bernie Sanders, on behalf of everyone in New Jersey that stands behind Bernie, and on behalf of everyone that is not of age to vote yet that really feels the Bern. And everybody in this country. I know that Hillary will make a great leader, but I believe that Bernie has really set the stage, and said that we can all do this, and we can do whatever we want. And get involved in our local politics. I’m so inspired and I’m not going to give up the fight.

26:40: “My vote will be 100% anti-Trump. I’ll tell you that”

27:00: “Bernie supporters, don’t just stand there and complain. Be the change you want to see in this world.

Jeff: “Was Bernie or Bust ever a consideration for you?”

“I’ll be honest, it was. But when I think about what’s going to happen and the role of the president has to take, I stepped out of my comfort zone and I really removed myself to figure out what would be the best strategy for the country. And I think that it would be keeping a Democrat in office as President of the United States, leading this country that makes it so great.”

Jeff: “Anything else you would say to the people that you know or Bernie or busters?”

Listen, that is completely your choice. But honestly, this is a very important election. We cannot allow Trump to nominate our Supreme Court justices. We can’t allow him to destroy our jobs, to keep folks down, right? You need to hold your political appointees accountable. I mean, this is exactly what we’re doing with Hillary, with what’s going on right now. We are really making the progressive platform. So just keep it going.

Bernie supporters, you have to make sure you hold folks accountable. Run for your own office. Get involved in your own area. And don’t just stand there and complain. Be the change you want to see in this world.

Jeff: “So let me ask you from a different point of view. If Trump does win, do you blame the Bernie or Busters?”

“No no. I mean if Trump does win, that’s just a damn slap in the face to Americans everywhere. I don’t blame anybody except for the people that voted for him, and the people that didn’t go out and vote.”

Jeff: “a lot of the Bernie or Busters may not go out and vote.”

“You know what? If you want to go out and vote and write Bernie Sanders name in? Cool. Go out and vote.”

Jeff: “So as long as they go and vote, even if it’s for Bernie Sanders or Jill Stein, then that’s OK.”

“Yes. That’s it. Go out and vote.”

Jeff: “But if they don’t go out and vote, then you have a problem.”

“Absolutely. Absolutely.”

Jeff: “OK, that’s fair.”

29:05: interview with Ivan Wei, The youngest Bernie delegate in New Jersey, a Hispanic, and my hotel roommate.

Jeff: “Good morning my little roommate.” Laughs.

Jeff: “And the smallest delegate New Jersey?” Laughs.

Ivan:

It’s a little disheartening. I thought that there might be something off to sleep with a contested convention or whatever. I mean, all the ringing (?) That went on. But as the previous lady [Kristen] said, I might write him in. But there are a lot more people running in November, it’s not just president. And I am a big believer in bottom up anyway. I don’t think my not voting for her is going to affect her too much, but I’m definitely not voting for Trump. But if Trump, God for bid, is the president, I will be leaving. Probably go to Australia.

Kristen: Regarding leaving the country because of Trump or the transpacific partnership. “I’m not about to give up on my country. I can’t totally bail. I’m not ready to just up and leave. I have a home, I’ve built where I am today… I’ll visit, I’ll travel the world, but, you know, it’s America the beautiful, man. I’m totally happy.”

Ivan:

As a minority, I don’t think I’d be comfortable with Trump. [I’m Latino, Columbian, but when some people say Mexican, that actually mean all Central and South America.] I don’t want a wall built. I have family that is undocumented. I don’t want them to be more scared than they already are. So as a Latino and a person of color… I don’t know, I don’t know. I just can’t even [en] vision trumping president. Too scary of a thought. I’ll do everything I can to prevent that.

36:00: Finally voting! “Did I just mess up the most important vote of my entire life?!”

My signature spend a couple lines, and they said I signed on the wrong line. I didn’t. I only half seriously said, “Did I just mess up the most important vote of my entire life?!”

38:55: “Fran and Kristin, can I tell you something? I just voted for Bernie Sanders.”

Me too! Woo hoo. High five.

Nuisance: Tues 7/26: NJ Bernie delegation meeting with superdelegate John Wisniewski: New Jersey doesn’t protest like other states. New Jersey is “better than that”. [Timestamped highlights]

New Jersey Bernie delegation meeting with NJ superdelegate John Wisniewski. Immediately after roll call voting.

39:25-51:00: Pre-speech

39:25: “DWS got a promotion after we found out that she rigged the election. What does that say about us and as a party?”

Richard MacFarlane, New Jersey delegate and my hotel roommate.

“I’m really disappointed that DWS got a promotion after we found out that she rigged the election. What does that say about us and as a party?”

Jeff: “You voted for Bernie right?”

“Yes I definitely voted for Bernie.”

Jeff: “High-five.”

41:30: Bertin Lefkovic, New Jersey delegate and my whip, explains what a whip is.

“Someone who passes information between the campaign in a delegation. But I haven’t been getting much information.”

45:00: My vote for Hillary Clinton is “100% anti-Trump.”

Ben Silva, Bernie delegate from Essex County New Jersey.

51:15-55:10: John Wisniewski speech: New Jersey doesn’t protest like other states. New Jersey is “better than that”.

Tonight is going to be an opportunity to show our support for Senator Sanders. By vote totals, and by cheering, and by applauding. But you all saw the email that the senator sent out. And the call, ultimately, as we get to the end of this convention, and ultimately election day, is to have a unified party.

And so it’s going to be up to us in New Jersey–and we can’t control what happens elsewhere–but it’s going to be up to us in New Jersey to acquit ourselves well, to show our support for Senator Sanders.

But you know, you’ve seen what some of the other delegations like California were doing yesterday. I think we’re better than that. I think that our behavior yesterday was great. There were people yesterday that were behind us, and I don’t know what it was about, but they had taped over their mouth and they said they were silenced. Masking tape over their mouth’s. I’d like to figure out what that was about. But that’s not New Jersey.

Jeff: “We need to be unified, but we don’t necessarily have to be happy about it. Doesn’t mean we should boo, but…”

Right. Listen. In accordance with what Senator Sanders said, you are all free to express yourself as you wish. Cast your votes as you wish. Say what you wish. But there’s a boundary line in terms of decorum. And what Senator Sanders is saying, let’s act responsible. Let’s be respectful.

Again, I know that there are a number of members of this delegation and nationally in Sanders’ camp, who are not entirely thrilled about where we are headed. The alternative is really scary. It’s really dangerous. And we have to make sure that we keep that in mind. Because, you know, ultimately, American political elections for president come down to a dichotomy. We have to keep that in mind. That it’s not her, it’s him.

As much as we wanted Senator Sanders to be the one accepting the nomination tonight, Having ‘that guy from New york’ take the oath of office in January of next year is, I think, a consequence that none of us could really accept in the long term. It would be devastating for all of the progressive values that we support.

And the other thing is that…the goal after this election is over is, we have a nationwide grassroots movement. 8 million individual contributions of $27, from people never involved in the political process, across the nation and in New Jersey, who are now energized about progressive values.

We need to keep that progressive movement alive. And what we can do through the close of this convention, but also after the convention and through the election, is make sure that people understand that we do support those progressive values. That the fight doesn’t end with this convention. It doesn’t end with this election. Because there’s only so much that can be done in one election season.

We’re going to continue to have that same agenda, about making sure kids aren’t crippled with student loan debt, that there’s pay equality between men and women. That people have a living wage. That we un-rig the financial system, and the list goes on.

We are all smart enough to know that this is all not going to happen between now and November. Some of it can happen shortly there after. A lot of it is going to take some more work.

58:05: My response to Wisniewski’s “not knowing what the tape over the mouth is about”

Jeff: “This would be a lot easier if there was some…there was less just outright celebration, ‘Oh, we’re so happy about Hillary’, and just some acknowledgement of–we have some serious issues and publicly acknowledging that. And it has–that tape across the mouth, is that feeling of we’re just not being listened to. That is the feeling of all of this party party party, with all of this suffering throughout the stadium.”

1:00:10-1:01:45: The next battleground in the political revolution is New Jersey.

Bert discusses running for local office in New Jersey in 2017, that this is the next battleground for the political revolution. He list specific positions.

1:04:45: Lessons from the Dean Campaign from 2004

“We must continually search for good local candidates”

1:06:00: Peter Jacobs, New Jersey delegate and the only Berniecrat candidate in New Jersey in the general this year.

“When you guys go home Friday morning, Thursday night, the political revolution stays alive. Because our campaign is heading to the general election as the first Bernie Sanders Democrat–and the only one–going to the general in New Jersey in November.”

Nuisance: Tues 7/26: Reviewing DNC day one: “I was told to be a good girl. It’s heartbreaking.” [Timestamped highlights]

Liz Maratea, New Jersey delegate, and Jeff review DNC day one and the upcoming roll call.

Highlights in this video

0:40: “It’s not a convention, it’s a four day long Hillary Clinton party.”

1:45-6:15: “They’re not interested in listening.”

Jeff: “The Democratic Party is so-called ‘for everyone’ and ‘listens to everyone’, ‘listens to the little guy’, but there’s no interest in changing it from a coronation. They don’t want to hear from the little guy, they just want to coronate Hillary Clinton…’Coronate’, is that the right term?

…They’re not interested in listening. And they’re actively trying to suppress that, by holding signs in front of us and…threatening credentials–”

Liz: “Throwing hats.”

Jeff: “Throwing hats?”

Liz: “My hat was taken from my head and thrown like a frisbee from Maine to Illinois last night.”

Jeff: “That is a really long distance.” Smiles.

Liz: “[Whoosh sound with a throwing gesture.] Winged it. I was kicked at on the stairs, people trying to trip me. I was kicked out on the floor, people trying to trip me. I was shoved, people jabbed me in the stomach during Michelle Obama’s speech when she hit us(?) with her ‘Hillary Clinton isn’t angry or disillusioned’ comment. ‘That one got you in the stomach, didn’t it?’ Knuckled me right in the ribs.”


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Jeff: “Would those people say you provoked them?”

Liz: “I was standing there watching the stage. I was standing, I was holding my ‘Michelle’ sign.”

3:12: Jeff: “I didn’t personally experience any of that kind of stuff. I wasn’t there when it happened. What I can say is, there is a lot of disrespect and…disgust that we were there to begin with.”

Liz: “We were asked, ‘Why are you here? Why did you even come here? Go home.’ Being treated like [we were] Republicans.”

Jeff: “They just want us to be quiet and let them have their party. So I’ve decided personally, instead of complaining there, I’m complaining to the people who are interested in hearing them, which is you guys [points to the camera].”

Liz: “I was really excited to register as a Democrat when I was 18. I couldn’t wait. I was born to be a liberal. Born to be a Democrat.

I don’t feel welcome here. I walk around breakfast [in the hotel] and ask if I can sit down, and it’s like Forrest Gump on the school bus [everyone covers the empty seats with her hands]…

I have not directly engaged in any arguments. If they really wanted to unite the party, they would have spoken to all of us. We’re not speaking to us. They’re telling us–I was so told so many times last night to behave myself. I was told to be a good girl. How my supposed to feel about that? I’m 31 years old. This is the fourth election I’m voting in. The fifth one I’m involved in. It’s heartbreaking.”

6:15: Ivan: “I was a little disappointed that Bernie didn’t do a mic drop, saying, ‘Guys, I’m kidding, it’s a contested convention.’ “

It was a long day on the floor, let me tell you. I was there 330 to 1130. Ran out of food, but the speeches were good. I was a little disappointed that Bernie didn’t do a mic drop, saying, ‘Guys, I’m kidding, it’s a contested convention.’…

Before this convention, people felt that when he endorsed Hillary two weeks ago, that he gave up on us. But the thing is, if we trusted Bernie up until the endorsement…we can’t stop trusting him now. He started a revolution, he is the face of that revolution, he understands that. But the revolution needs more than just one guy…

He’s bringing that up to us and saying, ‘Yeah, we need a call to arms of other people to take over this revolution, and continue it in the fight. I will still be here because I’m going to hold everyone accountable.’

9:15: Liz: “He [Bernie] can’t make people fall in line. The problem is the DNC made this mess and they’re making him clean it up.”

11:25: Michelle: “I did not wear any Bernie gear because I did not want to be treated badly. That was my assumption, and I was sad to learn that it was right.”

Michelle McFadden-DiNicola, New Jersey delegate From Highland Park New Jersey.

This is my first convention and I stressed a little bit about it. I wore some neutral gear [yesterday at the first day of the convention]. I did not wear any Bernie gear [because] I did not want to be treated badly. That was my assumption, and I was sad to learn that I was right. That people were being mistreated.

So I’m feeling a little disheartened about the calls for unity. I know that’s coming from Bernie and that it’s sincere, but I don’t feel that it’s being taken seriously…by Hillary supporters…

They still are viewing us as a nuisance. And being treated like a nuisance, I was emboldened today to show up with more Bernie gear than ever. Because if they are going to treat me as a nuisance anyway, then I might as well show my support.

The bus arrives at the Wells Fargo Center. Specifically on Pattison Avenue, directly between the Wells Fargo Center and FDR Park.

Nuisance: Tues 7/26: Michelle, crying: “I am so happy to see that you are not happy. It’s just gorgeous.”

Bernie Sanders delegates and their supporters have been struggling to communicate through all of the barriers placed between us.

Eric Beechwood, an independent Berniecrat, running in the 2016 general for Congress in New Jersey (who I met at the Pemberton Bernie Sanders campaign office, and is now working for Philly.FYI, who helped organize a lot of the protests at FDR Park and around the convention), wrote me the following on Monday night. He told me to look for protesters at the gate at FDR Park, when we arrive at the DNC on our state-delegation hotel shuttle bus.

As we arrive, we see a small amount of people behind the gates at FDR Park. It’s hard to make out. When we get off the bus, it is still hard to see people, but their chants are clear.

Jeff: “We see you! We hear you!”

We thought that was it. But as we walk in to go to security, someone notices that there are a lot more supporters at the end of the block, towards the corner of Broad and Pattison.

Their cheers are very clear, and as we see them, we give them a thumbs up in acknowledgement. It is an emotional release for both sides.

Michelle McFadden-DiNicola, a fellow New Jersey pledged delegate for Bernie Sanders, is crying.

I am overwhelmed. I’m overwhelmed. I can’t– They actually care. And there’s so many of you. There’s so many of you. I’m just overwhelmed. And, um, I’m losing it. I don’t know if it really, um, makes sense to my brain.

With everything, all the messages were getting as delegates, from the DNC, is that, just calm down, everything is cool, we are all going to unify. Hillary is great, everything is OK. And it’s going to be great, she’s the first woman President, you know?

I keep getting these messages, these, like, implicit messages, to just kind of be happy. Just be happy. And I’m so happy to see that you are not happy. I’m so happy that you’re angry with me, because I’m so angry.

I’m so proud of you for being out there. I know It’s not easy to get out there. You have families and jobs and other things to do. It’s just gorgeous. Thank you.

Nuisance: Tues 7/26: Alleged fraudulent use of delegate credentials, and voice votes in DNC stadium dramatically skewed in Hillary Clinton’s favor.

Two Bernie delegates from Kansas, who wish to stay anonymous until after the roll call is made official, report a Pennsylvania woman with delegate credentials that were given to her by her father–her father is a delegate, she is not. She is therefore fraudulently using these credentials to vote. I am unsure, but I believe that the father is a Hillary delegate.

At the official end of rollcall, it was planned to confront that person, with these two delegates’ help. Unfortunately the #DNCWalkout occurred at that time, so the follow up never happened.

“When you do a voice vote, there are roughly 20, 25,000 people in the building. You’ve got ushers, you’ve got vendors, you’ve got everybody else. So how are the 5,000 delegates that are on the floor able to accurately be counted?”

Jeff: “And you have 1,900 Bernie delegates.”

Kansas delegate: “Correct. So even if we wanted to oppose a particular motion, how are we able to accurately do that, when we’re supposed to be going up against 2,300 other delegates, but when we’re actually going up against at least 15,000 other people?”

Nuisance: Tue 7/26: I’m quoted in the Burlington County Times (NJ): “I’m more interested in the candidate that wants to show me what they’re about as opposed to threaten me with someone that’s worse.”

Caruso is among those who believe the Sanders and Clinton Democrats will be able to come to the table to shake hands and work together again, as disagreeing Democrats have in the past.

But some believe the gap is too big to close.

Jeff Epstein, a Sanders delegate from Burlington County, said the celebration over Clinton’s success overpowers the fact that there’s a lack of interest on the part of Clinton backers to really listen to the views of Sanders supporters and make them feel part of the Democratic Party.

“I don’t feel really wanted,” he said. “I feel like a nuisance in some ways. It’s their party and I don’t feel very welcome to this party. They (Clinton supporters) just feel Hillary has won and it’s over.”

Epstein said he doesn’t see a way to bridge that divide.

“There’s just so much baggage that’s there’s no way around it. If they did what we felt was right, to sit down with us and come to a resolution … the amount that it would take to do that is infinite,” he said.

Epstein said he’s not a “Bernie or Bust” kind of supporter, but he has a deal breaker if he is to vote for Clinton.

“She needs to earn my vote, as opposed to Trump,” he said. “I’m much more interested in the candidate that wants to show me what they’re about as opposed to threaten me with someone that’s worse.”

Original link, behind a pay wall.

Full article text:

2016 Democratic National Convention

Divisions among Democrats at DNC: some say they can be bridged; others disagree
By Kristina Scala, staff writer Jul 26, 2016

Bernie Sanders supporters wait outside while media is shut in during a sit-in at Tent 2 in the press village moments after Hillary Clinton secured enough votes to deem her the Democratic presidential nominee at the Wells Fargo Center onTuesday, July 26, 2016.

As the second night of the Democratic National Convention was underway, mixed opinions swirled around whether supporters of Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton would be able to mend the divide that separates them and the Democratic Party.

On the floor of the Wells Fargo Center, some DNC delegates held signs that read “Love Trumps Hate.” Others were decked out in pins and shirts and hats with Sanders’ picture. One man was spotted wearing a jacket with “Feel the Bern” boldly written on the back in battery-powered lights.

And while some Sanders delegates expressed their distaste for the messages delivered during Monday night’s speeches, the Clinton delegates said they want nothing more then to work together with the Sanders delegates.

“We’re pros at this. We have squabbles, we have disagreements, and our party builds up and builds even stronger,” said Bill Caruso, a Sanders delegate from Camden County. “I expect that’s going to come as a result of this effort and I think that we are going to be unified in the fall.”

Caruso is among those who believe the Sanders and Clinton Democrats will be able to come to the table to shake hands and work together again, as disagreeing Democrats have in the past.

But some believe the gap is too big to close.

Jeff Epstein, a Sanders delegate from Burlington County, said the celebration over Clinton’s success overpowers the fact that there’s a lack of interest on the part of Clinton backers to really listen to the views of Sanders supporters and make them feel part of the Democratic Party.

“I don’t feel really wanted,” he said. “I feel like a nuisance in some ways. It’s their party and I don’t feel very welcome to this party. They (Clinton supporters) just feel Hillary has won and it’s over.”

Epstein said he doesn’t see a way to bridge that divide.

“There’s just so much baggage that’s there’s no way around it. If they did what we felt was right, to sit down with us and come to a resolution … the amount that it would take to do that is infinite,” he said.

Epstein said he’s not a “Bernie or Bust” kind of supporter, but he has a deal breaker if he is to vote for Clinton.

“She needs to earn my vote, as opposed to Trump,” he said. “I’m much more interested in the candidate that wants to show me what they’re about as opposed to threaten me with someone that’s worse.”

U.S. Congressman Donald Norcross, representing Camden, Gloucester and parts of Burlington counties, said he believes the Democrats have already come together in the democratic process when they voted for Clinton as the party’s nominee.

The Democrat from Camden said he believes each speech that was made represented the core values of all Democrats — a livable wage, pay equality, and creating more domestic jobs. He said that despite the divide between Sanders and Clinton supporters, the next few days will become a path that would lead to a united party.

“I’m really proud of Democrats for coming together and having this conversation,” he said. “You’re not going to please 100 percent of the people 100 percent of the time. But at the end of the day, you’ll see that over the course of the next few days, Democrats coming together.”